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20 Times This Woman Found The Most Unique Old Things By The Seashore

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Maristella, a handmade jewelry designer from Slovenia, spends most of her day searching for interesting items on the beach to create beautiful beach-themed jewelry. She mostly uses seashells and other items for her unique handmade ornaments. In her quest for finding interesting treasures, she often gets some antique things.

On Bored Panda, she explains, “While searching for seashells on the beach, I was finding a lot of glass, ceramics, old coins, silverware, and other amazing 100-year-old finds. With some research, I found out that I find so many vintage and antique items because in the past (around 100 years ago), Italian ships would come here and dump trash in the sea. Over the years, with the waves and many storms, historic finds that are hidden under the mud in the sea wash up on the beach.”

Maristella has revealed her passion for jewelry-making earlier on DeMilked, check it out here. For more information, check out her Etsy shop. Meanwhile, you can scroll below to find out what interesting vintage stuff she found by the seashore.

More info: Instagram

#1 Kerosene Lamp Burner

A part of a 1850s R. DITMAR Wien kerosene lamp burner. Brothers Rudolf and Fredrich Ditmar relocated from Germany to Austria (Vienna) in 1839 where they traded in oil lamps. In 1841 they started their own lamp factory. A decade later they succeeded in developing the “moderator lamp” that could be used reliably thanks to having an option to adjust the intensity of the flame. The international success enabled the further expansion of the company, which continued after Friedrich Ditmar’s death as “Lamps and Metalware Factory R. Ditmar”.

#2 Atkinson’s Rose Cold Cream

This is a part of a stoneware pot lid for Atkinson’s Rose Cold Cream. Dates late 1800’s to early 1900’s. It was a cream for men to use after shaving and on their lips. It was also a fine rose perfume. His store was at 24 Old Bond Street in London. A street known for prestigious or expensive shops.

#3 Vintage Spoon

#4 Luxardo Bottle

This bottle is from around 1880/1890 and was once filled with maraschino liquor made by the family Luxardo, as you can see from the glass stamp. They were one of the most famous families making this liquor and even received many awards for it.

#5 100 Year Old (Part Of A) Button From The Austro-Hungarian Empire Times

#6 Clay Marbles

Antique clay marbles, a popular Victorian toy – dating from the 1800s. These are much more common to find than glass marbles because they were easier to make and more affordable.

#7 Vintage Fork

This fork is made from the Alpacca material and is from the 19th/20th century. It has a tiny symbol and the marking C&D on it. Before aluminum came on the scene alpaca was the popular material of the cutlery industry in the years of the 18-19th century. It counted as a rather great achievement, the factories stamped every piece with their own mark. The nice silver color of the alpaca is due to the nickel, extensibility comes from copper and zinc gives its melting ability.

#8 Different Glass Bottles

#9 200-Year-Old Cosmacendi Maraschino Bottle

One of my proudest is a 200-year-old undamaged Maraschino bottle from the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After finding it, I returned it back »home« to the Cosmacendi Palace (located in Zadar, Croatia), where the maker of the bottle once lived, and which is now the Museum of Ancient Glass! It was not only an incredible find, but also a bottle without any proof that it even existed. The museum was thrilled to have gotten this amazing piece of history and I was over the moon to have contributed to their collection.

#10 Roncegno Bottle

The natural mineral water Roncegno, enriched with compounds of iron and arsenic from the eponymous source in northern Italy, near Trento, has been in circulation since the second half of the 19th century.

From 1867, the right to use the spring was bought by the brothers Girolamo and Francesco Waiz, whose company (Dita Fratelli Waiz), in addition to the production of spring medicinal water – Acqua Roncegno – in the 70s of the 19th century took over the building of the thermal spa in Roncegno. Since then, the whole place has experienced a short-lived but notable economic boom. The spa was known throughout the Austro-Hungarian lands, and was advertised in newspapers at the very beginning of the 20th century, most often with the simultaneous advertising of the healing water Roncegno.

#11 Brainovich Glass Stamp

Maraschino bottle stamp made during the Austro-Hungarian Empire time by Simeone Brainovich. I usually find stamps from Zadar (Zara) but this one is from Split, Croatia (Spalato).

#12 Antique Beer Bottle

This bottle with the words “Proprieta’ L. Dejak Pola” was from a gentleman named Luigi Dejak. He was mostly known for his beer and wine in Pola at the end of the 19th century. His wine received many prizes around Europe for its amazing flavor and quality. This specific bottle was filled with beer.

#13 Toothbrush With Markings: G. B. Kent & Sons London

Toothbrush with markings: G. B. Kent & Sons London.

Kent Brushes was founded in 1777. They’ve supplied Royal households with their hairbrushes.

They’ve been involved in both World Wars, equipping millions of brushes to troops in the Army, Navy and RAF, even creating special brushes in which maps and compasses were concealed to help the war effort.

#14 Victorian Art Glass Vase

The Victorian art glass vase is from the second half of the 19th century. It has an applied trail of blue rigaree citrine glass trailing around the vase and a lovely silver design of a branch with flowers, leaves, and acorns.

#15 German Company Oberselters Mineral Water Bottle From 1860s

Clay bottle that contained mineral water. It’s from a German company named OberSelters that even today sells mineral water. The stamp on this bottle was used only on bottles made from 1836 to 1866.

#16 Victorian Cherry Toothpaste

Victorian Cherry Toothpaste pot lid, made by John Cosnell & Co. London. This find is from 1850-1900. Toothpaste for “beautifying and preserving the teeth and gums.”

#17 Rifle Bullet 1888

The 8×52mmR Mannlicher cartridge was first introduced in 1888 for the Mannlicher M1888 rifle. It was made in and also used by the Austro-Hungarian Empire from 1888 to 1890.

#18 120+ Year Old Coins

These are “Hellers” from the Austro – Hungarian Empire. On one side there’s a double-headed eagle, on the other side the number 2 and the year it was made. On one piece you can see the year 1897! In Austria-Hungary, Heller was the term used in the Austrian half of the empire for 1/100 of the Austro-Hungarian krone (the other being fillér in the Hungarian half), the currency from 1892 until after the demise (1918) of the Empire.

#19 L’acqua Di Melissa

This bottle, with the words “Melissa dei c scalzi” on one side and “Venezia” on the other, is the famous “l’Acqua di Melissa” – healing water made from the Melissa herb. I have contacted the so-called barefoot Carmelite Fathers of the Venetian Province and they have told me that this bottle was made in the early 1800s.

According to the archives, during lunch in the Carmelite convent in Venice a friar wasn’t feeling good, so the father helped him not to faint by giving him the water of Melissa to smell. It is claimed to be the first proof of the use of the magical water, made from Melissa Moldavica, distilled from Carmelite religious since 1710. The recipe for the magical water was written in 1841.

#20 Button From An Austro-Hungarian Marine Uniform

A button from the Austro-Hungarian Navy (1867–1918). It was a part of the uniform that sailors working on warships wore.

The post 20 Times This Woman Found The Most Unique Old Things By The Seashore appeared first on DeMilked.

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Look at this stuff, isn't it neat? Wouldn't you think that my collection's complete?

“Antipodes” by Rustam QBic in Togliatti, Russia (7 photos)

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Street Artist Rustam QBic

“Antipodes” by Rustam QBic at Frunze, 2 in Togliatti, Russia for SAMARA GROUND 2021.

Rustam QBic: In this piece I continue to consider two topics: antipodes as ancient myth and comparison of two opponents, opposite situations. And considerations of gadgets and books. I would like people to use both wisely and find a happy medium.

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How a Librarian and a Food Historian Rediscovered the Recipes of Moorish Spain

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“Take large fine-tasting carrots, lightly scrape their skins, cut them in half lengthwise, and then split each half into two pieces.”

For centuries, that’s as far as any cook could get when preparing “A dish [of carrots in sauce]” from Ibn Razīn al-Tujībī’s Fiḍālat al-Khiwān fī Ṭayyibāt al-Ṭaʿām wa-l-Alwān (Best of Delectable Foods and Dishes from al-Andalus and al-Maghrib), a cookbook composed in Tunis around 1260. The rest of the recipe (more on that later), together with dozens of others, disappeared sometime after the late 1600s.

Most of the cookbook’s 475 recipes survived in copies. Yet that maddeningly incomplete carrot recipe, along with missing chapters on vegetables, sauces, pickled foods, and more, left a gaping hole in all existing editions of the text, like an empty aisle in the grocery store.

That was until July of 2018, when the British Library’s curator of Arabic scientific manuscripts, Dr. Bink Hallum, was cataloguing a text on medieval Arab pharmacology in the library’s collections.

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“I was very surprised when I found that the manuscript also contained a very long fragment, a little over 200 pages, of a cookbook,” says Hallum. What he had stumbled upon was a nearly complete copy of the Fiḍāla dating to the 15th or perhaps 16th century, making it the world’s oldest extant copy.

Still, because the document lacked a title page, its identity remained a mystery. Acting upon a colleague’s recommendation, Hallum eventually sent a link to the manuscript to food historian Nawal Nasrallah, who, as it happened, was busy translating one of the incomplete copies of the Fiḍāla from Arabic into English.

“It was just like a gift from God,” says Nasrallah. “I hated the idea that I was working with an incomplete book and was coming nearer and nearer to the missing parts.”

In addition to the title page, the table of contents was also absent from the British Library copy. Yet Nasrallah immediately realized what she was looking at.

“I knew right away. I was reading the manuscript on the screen, and I saw that there they were, the missing recipes,” says the Iraqi-born Nasrallah, an experienced translator of historic culinary texts from the Arab world.

With this new material in hand, including 55 missing recipes, she was able to piece together the first full English translation of al-Tujībī’s Fiḍāla, which was published this September by Brill. It remains one of only a handful of surviving cookbooks from Moorish Spain, an era when food was deeply intertwined with those traditionally taboo dinner-table topics: religion and politics.

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From roughly 700 to 1200, most of Spain was under Muslim rule. Christians and Jews were free to worship, and observe their dietary customs, in an atmosphere of coexistence known to history as Convivencia. Whereas Jews and Muslims shared food prohibitions, such as pork, commonly eaten by Christians, cooks from all three religions enjoyed many ingredients first brought to the Iberian peninsula by the Arabs: rice, eggplants, carrots, lemons, sugar, almonds, and more.

“Even couscous, widely seen as one of the most indicative items among ‘Muslim’ foods, was also eaten and enjoyed by Christians in late medieval and early modern Spain,” observed the late scholar Olivia Remie Constable in To Live Like a Moor.

This was the age of al-Tujībī, a well-educated scholar and poet from a wealthy family of lawyers, philosophers, and writers. As a member of the upper class, he enjoyed a life of leisure and fine dining which he set out to celebrate in the Fiḍāla. Even if many of the recipes were too daunting for most cooks, al-Tujībī promised that they would “rarely fail to please with their novelty and exquisiteness.”

But starting around 1200, the high cuisine al-Tujībī faced extinction as the tolerant spirit of Convivencia began to erode. Christian armies marching south gradually captured the city-states of al-Andalus (Andalusia), heartland of Muslim Spain, in a campaign known as the Reconquista. By 1492, many Jews had either been massacred or expelled from the peninsula, while Muslims faced the same fate a century later. Those remaining were hunted by the Inquisition and forced to either convert, which meant openly adopting a Christian diet, or face expulsion or even death.

Many reluctant Jewish converts (Conversos) and their Muslim counterparts (Moriscos) publicly worshipped as Christians while practicing their true faiths behind closed doors, including those of the kitchen.

“Food became a marker of identity,” says Ana Gómez-Bravo, a professor of Spanish and Portuguese Studies at the University of Washington.

“We know from Christian records that there was a lot of surveillance of who cooks the food, what ingredients go into that pot, and also who is present while the food is being prepared and consumed,” says Gómez-Bravo.

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This level of scrutiny spawned Jewish and Islamic “crypto-cuisines,” foods prepared according to religious custom but intended to fool the authorities, such as faux chuletas (pork chops), which were actually thick slices of fried, egg- and milk-soaked bread.

Conversos would throw an actual pork chop on the fire, to have the scent permeating the house, but were eating these things that were really French toast,” says Genie Milgrom, a descendent of conversos from Fermoselle in Spain’s Zamora region and author of Recipes of My 15 Grandmothers, a collection of family recipes dating back to the time of the Inquisition.

While much of this persecution occurred after al-Tujībī’s time, by 1247 he recognized that to remain a Muslim in Christian Spain was untenable. So at the age of 20, he and his family fled the southeastern city of Murcia with multitudes of Andalusi refugees headed for Islamic North Africa, known to Arabs as the Maghreb.

Now impoverished, he ended up in the port city of Bijāya, in what is now Algeria, where he picked up what amounted to temp work as a scribe for the ruling Hafsid dynasty. By 1259, he settled in Tunis where he began writing the Fiḍāla, at the age of 33, and lived there until his death in 1293.

While he wrote other books on history and literature, only the Fiḍāla survives. Its composition, says Nasrallah, was an exercise in culinary nostalgia, a wistful look back across the Strait of Gibraltar to the elegant main courses, side dishes, and desserts of the author’s youth, an era before Spain’s Muslims and Jews had to hide their cultural cuisines.

“His aim was to preserve the beautiful cuisine he grew up on. He was seeing everybody fleeing Andalusia and was afraid that sooner or later people would forget this cuisine that he knew and enjoyed,” she says.

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When flipping through the 600 or so pages of the Fiḍāla’s recipes, their “novelty and exquisiteness,” as al-Tujībī characterized them, quickly becomes evident.

In tūma (eggplants “Looking Like Ostrich Eggs”), whole peeled and boiled eggplants are arranged vertically in a casserole topped with grated cheese, garlic, olive oil, and chopped walnuts.

Somewhat less elaborate, though no less self indulgent, were the breakfast treats mujabbanāt, fritter-like balls of fried semolina dough stuffed with cheese. Mujabbanāt spread to the rest of the Arab world where they were commonly served soaked in honey. Yet al-Tujībī specified that those “who want to serve mujabbanāt the way Andalusis do, [i.e.,] plain, without drenching them in honey” should place them on a platter, “sprinkle them with Ceylon cinnamon, pounded aniseeds, and sugar,” and serve with “a small vessel filled with honey in the middle of the platter” for dipping.

The book also includes less laborious recipes such as the long-lost carrot recipe which calls for boiling the pieces until tender, browning them in olive oil, and simply finishing them with vinegar, garlic, and a sprinkle of caraway seeds.

Throughout, al-Tujībī doesn’t hide the politics behind the book, nor his fondness for the cuisine of his homeland.

“[I]n the field of cooking and whatever is related to it, Andalusis are indeed admirably earnest and advanced,” he wrote. They create “most delectable dishes, and in spite of the constricting limitations of their borders, and their proximity to the abodes of the enemies of Islam,” by which he meant the steadily encroaching Reconquista.

While the “enemies of Islam” no longer hammer at Andalusia’s borders, some modern chefs are looking to its rich culinary past for inspiration, embracing and recreating dishes al-Tujībī himself might recognize.

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After honing his kitchen management skills in al-Tujibi’s hometown of Murcia, fellow Andalusian Paco Morales returned to his hometown of Cordoba to open Noor in 2016. The restaurant’s menu is entirely derived from the Arab cuisine of pre-Reconquista Spain, including the Fiḍāla. (Dedicated to historical accuracy, Morales eschews using New World ingredients that were unknown in medieval Spain, such as chocolate, opting instead for carob in his “Almoravid carob” ice cream.) And at La Vara, in Brooklyn, chef-owner Alex Raij says menu items such as berenjena con miel (crispy fried eggplant served with labneh and honey), garbanzos fritos (fried chickpeas), and her almond torta Santiago reflect “the push and pull” of Andalusia’s Sephardic (Spanish Jewish) and Islamic culinary past, if not al-Tujībī’s very own story.

“La Vara imagines what Spain’s regionally specific dishes would look like if these [exiled] communities returned from the many parts of the world they left,” says Raij.

While al-Tujībī never saw his beloved al-Andalus again, thanks to the discovery of a 300-year-old clerical error, all of his favorite recipes have now returned home.

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Articles about food without any pictures of food should be sent back to the 8th circle of hell
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Magnificent Maps From the World Digital Library

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Launched in 2009, the World Digital Library [WDL] was a project of the U.S. Library of Congress, with the support of UNESCO, and contributions from libraries, archives, museums, educational institutions, and international organizations around the world. The WDL sought to preserve and share some of the world’s most important cultural objects, increasing access to cultural treasures and significant historical documents to enable discovery, scholarship, and use.

WDL partner institutions chose content for its cultural and historical importance, with due regard to recognition of the achievements of all countries and cultures over a wide range of time periods. The materials collected by the WDL include cultural treasures and significant historical documents including books, manuscripts, maps, newspapers, journals, prints, photographs, sound recordings, and films.

In 2020, the WDL Charter concluded. In 2021, after more than 10 years of operation, the Library transitioned WDL’s world-wide collection of cross-cultural treasures into a sustainable home for perpetual access on the Library of Congress’s main website. The original World Digital Library site is preserved by the Library of Congress Web Archive, which captures the look and feel of the site. Now available on the Library’s main website, the collection is a rich and valuable resource showing the diversity of the world’s cultures through the contributions of hundreds of organizations.

With the addition of the WDL material to the Library’s website, you may notice hundreds of new maps available in your searches of the digital map collections, scanned from partner institutions! While it was difficult to choose from so many wonderful maps, I have chosen five WDL maps to highlight in this post.

A black and white map that shows the earth in two horizontal heart shaped sections, with the bottom of the hearts touching one another.

World Map on Double Cordiform Projection. Map by Gerhard Mercator, 1538. Original held by the American Geographical Society Library. World Digital Library.

This world map on two sheets is an early work of the famous Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator (1512–94). Only two copies of the map are extant: this one from the American Geographical Society Library, and one at the New York Public Library. This is also the first map to apply the name America to the North American continent as well as to South America and to differentiate North and South America as separate continents. In using the term “America” in this way, Mercator shares responsibility with Martin Waldseemüller for naming the Western Hemisphere. Mercator was a master of engraving and a creator of mathematical instruments and terrestrial globes. His solution to the problem of accurately conveying the Earth’s sphere in only two dimensions, as used here in a double-heart-shaped projection, resulted in maps of greatly increased accuracy. Mercator’s navigational charts enabled compass bearings to be plotted in straight lines on charts and clarified longitude and latitude measurements.

Map of the world with south towards the top. The continents are outlined in green ink and a blue decorated border.

World Map. Map by Nicolas Desliens, 1566. Original held by the National Library of France. World Digital Library.

This portolan world map, drawn by Nicolas Desliens in 1566, synthesizes Norman hydrographic knowledge in the mid-16th century. It is one of two world maps by Desliens known to exist; the other dates from 1541. The map is oriented with south at the top and north at the bottom, giving it an upside-down look to the modern viewer. La Nouvelle France occidentalle (Western New France) is written in large letters over an arc-shaped North America. The map shows part of the western coast of North America, which extends beyond the edge of the map, but most of the Pacific Ocean is not shown. The map reflects the political affiliations of newly discovered lands. The territories claimed by France are indicated by flags with fleurs-de-lis, in Canada (Labrador), Florida (on the May River), and Brazil (on the Rio de la Plata). Desliens is known only from his work and inscriptions on his maps indicating that he worked in Dieppe and Arques; no biographical information about him survives.

Map of the Whole World. Published by Hayashi Jizaemon, 1671. Original held by National Diet Library. World Digital Library.

The first world map published in Japan appeared in 1645. Shown here is a popular version of that first map, published in 1671. It is divided into two parts: the right side contains an oblong egg-shaped world map with the east at the top, while the left side depicts people from 40 countries in national costume. The latter are arrayed in five rows of eight, depicting people both of existing countries, such as Portugal and the Netherlands, and imaginary countries, such as “Dwarf Country” and “Giant Country.” These maps are thought to be based on older Western maps, obtained during the age of Japanese trade with Portugal, and on the world map by Matteo Ricci (1552-1610) obtained through China, rather than on the newer and more accurate maps by Joan Blaeu (1596-1673) that were brought to Japan by the Dutch.

Bird's eye view map of Stockholm. A river cuts the city in half with islands in the center connected by bridges. It shows buildings, ships, roads, farmland, etc.

Stockholm. Map by Heinrich Neuhaus, 1870. Original held by the National Library of Sweden. World Digital Library.

Heinrich Neuhaus (1833–87) was a German-born map maker and lithographer who worked in Sweden for many years. His largest and best-known work is this panoramic map of Stockholm, which he created in the 1870s using an oblique image in isometric perspective. The buildings on the map are depicted with remarkable accuracy. Neuhaus is reported to have said that in order to produce the map, he walked through every neighborhood of the city and sketched the exterior of its buildings and other structures. The map captures the rapid growth of Stockholm that was characteristic of major European cities in the second half of the 19th century. Neuhaus made maps in a similarly three-dimensional style of the Stockholm districts of Norrmalm, Sodermalm, and Ostermalm.

A map of the United States with an overlay of a human body showing the blood vessels and organs. The head is on the west coast and the feet over the Atlantic Ocean.

The Man of Commerce. Map by Augustus F. McKay, 1889. Original held by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries. World Digital Library.

“The Man of Commerce” is a detailed map that conflates human anatomy with the American transportation system. Published in 1889 by the Land & River Improvement Company of Superior, Wisconsin, the map promotes Superior as a transportation hub and shows the routes of 29 railroads across the United States. The outline map of North America is superimposed by a cutaway diagram of the human body. The map’s metaphor makes West Superior “the center of cardiac or heart circulation.” The railways become major arteries. New York is “the umbilicus through which this man of commerce was developed.” The explanatory notes conclude: “It is an interesting fact that in no other portion of the known world can any such analogy be found between the natural and artificial channels of commerce and circulatory and digestive apparatus of man.” Use of the human body as a cartographic metaphor dates back at least to the 16th century, to the anthropomorphic map of Europe as a queen in Sebastian Münster’s Cosmography (1570). This map may be the earliest application of this metaphor to North America. The cartographer was A.F. McKay, who in 1889 briefly served as the editor of the Superior Sentinel newspaper. The map was engraved by Rand McNally. The American Geographical Society Library acquired the map in 2009, aided in part by the Map Society of Wisconsin. The only other known copy of this map is in a private collection.

These are merely a handful of WDL maps waiting to be explored. You can view all 1,420 World Digital Library maps here!

*Most of the text for this post was taken from the WDL Collection website and descriptions of the maps in the catalog records.

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Chuck Tingle's latest mocks those angry at bisexual Superman

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World's greatest author Chuck Tingle had a great response to the predictable right-wing backlash against the coming out of Jonathan Kent, son of Superman and Lois: he wrote a book about it.

Here's the setup for the hit new Tingler It's A Bird.Read the rest

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Topological bowls

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PDXL makes these handsome and fascinating Topo Bowls, each modeled on a real-life natural hole.

Lake topography is technically called bathymetry. We took some iconic lakes, laser cut layers, and made them into bowls. The larger bowls (Lake Tahoe and Crater Lake) are great fruit bowls; the smaller one (Walden Pond) makes a great valet for your wallet and keys.

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