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All I really need to say:

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roxanegay:


In canceling Milo’s book contract, Simon & Schuster made a business decision the same way they made a business decision when they decided to publish that man in the first place. When his comments about pedophilia/pederasty came to light, Simon & Schuster realized it would cost them more money to do business with Milo than he could earn for them. They did not finally “do the right thing” and now we know where their threshold, pun intended, lies. They were fine with his racist and xenophobic and sexist ideologies. They were fine with his transphobia, anti-Semitism and Islamophobia. They were fine with how he encourages his followers to harass women and people of color and transgender people online. Let me assure you, as someone who endured a bit of that harassment, it is breathtaking in its scope, intensity, and cruelty but hey, we must protect the freedom of speech. Certainly, Simon & Schuster was not alone in what they were willing to tolerate. A great many people were perfectly comfortable with the targets of Milo’s hateful attention until that attention hit too close to home.

Because I’ve been asked, I will not be publishing my book with Simon & Schuster now that they have dropped Milo. After I pulled my book, they changed the release date of Dangerous from March to June 13, the day my next book, Hunger, comes out. I said nothing because I was neither threatened nor concerned but it did reinforce for me that this was not a company I wanted to do business with. My protest stands. Simon & Schuster should have never enabled Milo in the first place. I see what they are willing to tolerate and I stand against all of it. Also, I’ve received far better offers for How to Be Heard from other publishers.

There are some who will spin the cancellation of this book contract as a failure of the freedom of speech but such is not the case. This is yet another example of how we are afforded the freedom of speech but there is no freedom from the consequences of what we say.

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Nadezh
3 hours ago
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Melbourne, Australia
bluebec
20 hours ago
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Melbourne
ameel
22 hours ago
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Melbourne, Australia
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Christmas wish granted for 'space nut' and his 11yo son

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February 21, 2017

Dear Academy person…

So starts a handwritten letter from 11-year-old Robert from Adelaide who wrote to us with a special request for his ‘space nut’ dad.

Robert wanted to surprise his dad at Christmas with Buzz Aldrin’s autograph.

We love science here at the Academy, and we also love seeing others excited by science, so we put our thinking caps on.

Buzz Aldrin had toured Australia last year but it was too late to request an autograph. So, how could we honour the Christmas wish of this boy and his father?

As we couldn’t get an astronaut, we could think of no better space superstar than Academy Fellow Professor Brian Schmidt—the Australian Nobel Prize winner who discovered Dark Energy.

Professor Schmidt’s discovery that the universe is growing at an accelerating rate—not slowing down as most people had thought—completely changed our understanding of the universe. It led Brian and his team to propose that 70% of the universe must be made up of dark energy, a hypothetical energy that fills space and opposes gravity, and since then there has been a flurry of activity to understand more about this mysterious force.

Also keen to foster an interest in science in the young (and not so young), Brian was happy to have a poster with his autograph sent to Robert.

The response (above) brought a tear to our eye and we were pleased to be able to meet both Robert and his dad Daren when we invited them to attend our IMMORTALITY event in Adelaide last week.

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bluebec
22 hours ago
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Melbourne
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"Reading history, it’s easy to point to a juncture and say, “That’s where things went wrong. I would..."

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Reading history, it’s easy to point to a juncture and say, “That’s where things went wrong. I would notice something as crazy as a rigged election, or a fascist coup, or the dismantling of democracy.” But not if it looks like business as usual. And usually, it does.

For instance, I did a lot of research about rigged elections, though much of this information didn’t end up in the book. Mostly because, like spy work, the details are a little boring.


Rigging an election is as simple as workers at certain polling places saying, “Did you bring your ID?” Or people “losing” ballot boxes. Or candidates telling bald-faced lies, saying they’ve won when they haven’t, and steamrolling any objection. Or, I don’t know, making a stink about some emails at a critical point one week before people head to the polls.


As I read my research material (sent to me by a friend who consults on electoral conflicts) I remember wondering, “That’s it? Why didn’t people…do something?” If rigged elections were decided by one momentous handshake in a dark, smoky room, I could understand—no one would see the problem to stop it. But these weren’t cloak and dagger operations. These were the end result of many banal injustices, piling up in the open.


There is no moment of “This Far and No Further.” These things happen by slow increments, a current growing swifter each moment as the river approaches the falls. Change is wrought by small actions, multiplying and metastasizing into something huge.



- Lara Elena Donnelly, from “Five Things I Learned Writing Amberlough” (via beyondvictoriana)
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bluebec
1 day ago
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Melbourne
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snowqueenkingdom: medievalpoc: Alexandre-Auguste...

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snowqueenkingdom:

medievalpoc:

Alexandre-Auguste Robineau 

Afro-French Fencing Master Joseph Bologne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges, and Transgender Woman Chevalier d'Éon duel at at Carlton House on 9 April 1787 in the presence of the Prince of Wales, sundry gentlemen and fencing aficionados.

Joseph Bologne was the son of French planter Georges Bologne and an enslaved woman named Nanon. He was was a champion fencer, virtuoso violinist, and conductor of the leading symphony orchestra in Paris. You can read more about him here.

Charles-Geneviève-Louis-Auguste-André-Timothée d'Éon de Beaumont,  Chevalier d'Éon, was a French spy, diplomat, and veteran of the Seven Years’ War. D'Éon appeared publicly as a man and pursued masculine occupations for 49 years; after 1777, she lived for 33 more years as a woman. You can read more about her here.

woah, is this cool piece of history real?

the links are literally right there for you to click

 here’s one of them: https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/400636/the-fencing-match-between-the-chevalier-de-saint-george-and-the-chevalier-deon

image

I can’t physically manifest in your house to click the links for you, but please believe me when I desperately, sincerely beg of you: ALWAYS CLICK THE LINKS. Every single thing I have ever said here has links for you to reference; sometimes the links go to stuff that **disagrees** with my assertions, because I want you to make up your own mind, and the truth is usually a matter of some (heated) debate!

A lot of the time, if you click these links, there is more information about what I’ve posted, and even MORE links, too!

image
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No one has to wonder whether or not what I’m posting is “real”; everything I do is meant to encourage you to see for yourself.

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bluebec
1 day ago
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Melbourne
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dragonreine: mswyrr: myloveforclexaisunreal: mswyrr: gentleman...

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dragonreine:

mswyrr:

myloveforclexaisunreal:

mswyrr:

gentlemanlupin:

Louise et Henriette - Mystère à la Tour Eiffel

bonus de la Havraise :

image

#SOMEONE EXPLAIN THIS TO ME WHERE CAN I FIND IT

ALRIGHT HERE ME OUT
You can watch it here : replaytvstreaming.com/telefilm-fiction/374-mystere-a-la-tour-eiffel-france-2.html

Really quick summary : The story takes place in Paris, 1889, the year the Eiffel Tower was built. Louise (Marie Denarnaud) is accused of killing three men, and she’s helped by Henriette (Aïssa Maïga)

Bad news : it’s in French, there are no subtitles, and I don’t know how long the link’s going to work

Good news : here is every scene Louise and Henriette share together (interracial lesbian couple, who cares about what they’re saying am i right)

9:03-14:45 (when they meet for the first time)
27:09-31:32 (some gay bonding time)
47:24-51:36 (that’s some gay shit right there)
52:47-55:25 (some plot related scenes, girlfriends investigating murders)
57:41-1:00:16 (more plot related scenes, i’m in love with Henriette eye roll at 58:44)
1:01:01-1:04:50 (their first kiss and some sexy time)
1:06:06-1:08:37 (Henriette isn’t really trying to kill Louise, she has been hypnotized (it makes sense in the story asdcbkjd))
1:23:13-1:25:00 (happy ending, alive lesbians in love with each other)

thank you! reblogging for everyone who speaks french and/or does not mind the lack of subtitles

@kathteamonroe OOOOH

*strangled gasp*

ok, so I’m reblogging this in hope that some enterprising fan might be willing to do a fan-sub??

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bluebec
1 day ago
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Melbourne
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superheroesincolor: Before There Was Mozart: The Story of Joseph...

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superheroesincolor:

Before There Was Mozart: The Story of Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-George (2012)

“The musical superstar of 18th-century France was Joseph Boulogne—a black man. This inspiring story tells how Joseph, the only child of a black slave and her white master, becomes “the most accomplished man in Europe.” After traveling from his native West Indies to study music in Paris, young Joseph is taunted about his skin color. 

Despite his classmates’ cruel words, he continues to devote himself to his violin, eventually becoming conductor of a whole orchestra. Joseph begins composing his own operas, which everyone acknowledges to be magnifique. But will he ever reach his dream of performing for the king and queen of France?

 This lushly illustrated book by Lesa Cline-Ransome and James E. Ransome introduces us to a talented musician and an overlooked figure in black history.”

By Lesa Cline-Ransome (Author), James E. Ransome (Illustrator)

Get it here

Lesa Cline-Ransome is the writer of many picture books. Her picture book biography titles include Satchel Paige, Major Taylor, Champion Cyclist, Young Pele, Soccer’s First Star, Helen Keller, The World in Her Heart, Before There was Mozart and Words Set me Free: The Story of Young Frederick Douglass. Other titles are Quilt Alphabet, Quilt Counting and her newest is Light in the Darkness, A Story about How Slaves Learned in Secret.

Originally from Malden, Massachusetts, Lesa has worked as a proofreader, fashion copywriter, publicist, teacher in the New York City Schools, and taught writing for adults. She has a B.F.A. in Merchandising and Management from Pratt Institute and an M.A. in Education from N.Y.U.

She lives in Rhinebeck, New York and with her husband and frequent collaborator, illustrator James Ransome, four children and St. Bernard, Nola.


[Follow SuperheroesInColor faceb / instag / twitter / tumblr / pinterest]

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bluebec
1 day ago
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Melbourne
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